Heimer Engineering New York pre-purchase home, building, condo, and co‑op inspection
646.757.4500

Applying Scientific and
Engineering Principles to
Home Inspections and
Building Inspections

Plumbing Systems and
Home Inspections

Professional Engineer Inspectors
Applying Scientific and Engineering
Principles to Home Inspections
and Building Inspections

Pre-Purchase Home, Building, Condo, and
Co-op Inspections in Manhattan, Queens,
Brooklyn, Bronx, Staten Island, Nassau,
Suffolk, Rockland, Putnam, and Westchester

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Plumbing describes different systems in a home, building, condo unit, or co-op unitThe plumbing system is examined as part of a Professional Engineer's home inspection. Plumbing describes different systems in a home or building. Plumbing can mean fixtures such as a sink or tub, pipes that bring water to the fixtures, pipes that drain the sewage from the fixtures, gas supply lines, underground sprinkler systems, heating pipes, etc. Our Professional Engineers examines the plumbing for function, leaks, sufficiency of water supply, etc.

One of the biggest concerns of many home, building, condo, and co-op purchasers is leakage. Water dripping from a pipe is an obvious leak. Other types of leakage can be difficult to detect, since all that is visible is a dry stain on a ceiling or a piece of duct tape wrapped around a drain line. The Professional Engineer evaluates both the obvious leaks and the difficult to detect leaks.

The Water Meter

Water for a building is supplied either by a municipal water supplier or is pumped from a private well.Water for a building is supplied either by a municipal water supplier or is pumped from a private well. Regardless of the source of the water, it travels through underground pipes and into the home, building, condo unit, or co-op unit. These pipes are buried below the frost line to prevent freezing during the cold winter months. If the building is served by well water, there is usually a water storage tank in the basement.

Municipal Water

Private Wells

If the water comes from a municipal water supplier, the water is metered. The water meter is often located where the main water line enters the building, although many communities now locate the water meter outside the building to facilitate reading of the meter. In these buildings, you will see a cover, typically labeled Water Meter, outside the building. There is no need to meter private well water. If you see a water meter, the building likely has municipally supplied water.

Water Supply Pressure

If the building is less than six stories tall, the pressure supplied from the street can usually push the water up to all the levels of the building.If the building is less than six stories tall, the pressure supplied from the street can usually push the water up to all the levels of the building.

Taller buildings, and buildings in areas with low street pressure, may need supplemental pumps. Otherwise, sufficient water pressure and flow rate may not be available on the upper floors.

During hot and humid days, water supply pressure sometimes drops. This is usually caused by a large volume of water usage. For example, fire hydrants may be opened on hot and humid days. If your house or building is inspected on a hot and humid day, expect a slightly lower water pressure.

If there are a lot of underground sprinkler systems in your neighborhood, water pressure may drop off when the sprinklers are in operation.

Water Supply Plumbing

Water supply lines are made of copper, brass, galvanized steel, plastic, or leadWater supply lines are made of copper, brass, galvanized steel, plastic, or lead:

  1. Lead water lines were used until the 1930s. Since lead water lines increase the risk of lead in the water, they are no longer used. If the building is served by a lead water main, it should be tested for lead in the water.
  2. Plastic, until recently, was used for outdoor plumbing and underground sprinkler lines. With the increasing cost of metal, interior plastic water lines are becoming much more common in newer buildings.
  3. Galvanized steel plumbing was used for water lines years ago. Galvanized steel plumbing becomes clogged because of corrosion over time. Galvanized steel plumbing is also more likely to develop leaks as it ages.
  4. Copper and brass are the most popular types of material used for supply lines today (although plastic is seen more and more). Copper and brass plumbing has the longest leak-free life expectancy.

Our Professional Engineers evaluate the plumbing in the home, building, condo, or co-op. If there are any problems in the observable plumbing lines, our engineers will advise you of them.

Lead in Water

Underground Sprinklers

The underground pipes for most sprinkler systems are made of plastic.Some buildings have an underground sprinkler system. The underground pipes for most sprinkler systems are made of plastic. Since the pipes are underground, leakage problems are difficult to find. Often, leaks are found only when a building owner observes that part of the lawn is turning brown because it is not being watered properly.

Steam and Hot Water
Heat Plumbing

Steam heat is typically distributed in steel pipes to large cast-iron radiators.Many homes and buildings are heated by hot water (hydronic) or steam. Hot water is typically pumped by a circulator pump, while the steam rises naturally. The steam or heated water are distributed in pipes throughout the building:

  • Steam heat is typically distributed in steel pipes to large cast-iron radiators. These pipes may be covered with asbestos containing insulation. The steam pipes are typically connected to cast iron radiators.

    Asbestos
  • Hot water heat is usually distributed in copper pipes, although plastic is found in newer home, building, condo unit, and co-op unit. The hot water pipes are connected to either cast iron radiators or baseboard radiators in the rooms. Baseboard radiators are typically made from copper tubing with aluminum fins.

Drain Plumbing

The drain lines carry wastewater through the building and into the sewer, septic tank, or cesspool.The drain lines carry wastewater through the building and into the sewer, septic tank, or cesspool. The wastewater flows due to gravity. Therefore, the waste water lines are considerably larger than water supply lines and are pitched toward their final destination. Drain lines are typically made of copper, cast iron, brass, or plastic.

The most common problem with drain lines is leakage. Drain lines sometimes become blocked, but this is less common than drain line leaks. Drain line leaks are sometimes intermittent. For example, a drain may leak when someone is standing in a bathtub, but not when they are sitting in the tub. The Professional Engineer evaluates the accessible drain lines.

Plumbing Fixtures

The water has to be turned on and off, the flow rate needs to be controlled, and the water temperature needs to be adjusted.The plumbing is more than just the pipes. The water has to be turned on and off, the flow rate needs to be controlled, and the water temperature needs to be adjusted.

Plumbing fixtures accomplish these tasks. Some fixtures have a one handle control. Other fixtures have a separate control for hot and cold water. Some bathtub fixtures have additional controls to set whether the water comes out of the tub spout or shower head.

Checking a plumbing fixture may seem relatively easy, but it is more than just seeing if the fixture either leaks or does not leak.

Our Professional Engineers check for flow rate problems, other functional problems, insufficient water pressure, and scalding hot water.

Shut Off Valves

Can you show me the location of the shut off valves?One of the more common questions asked is "Can you show me the location of the shut off valves?"  Many prospective buyers feel this is an important piece of information that should be obtained at the inspection.

The Professional Engineer will tell you the location of the shut off valves if the location can be determined. Often, these valves are hidden by stored material. After you move into the building, make sure that you do not block the shutoff valves.

While the location of the shut off valves is of interest, there are more important issues with which to be concerned. The structural system, foundation, electrical system, heating system, hot water system, structural termite damage, and water in the basement, are a few of the other important areas checked by our engineers during the home, building, condo, or co-op inspection.

Gas Plumbing

 If you smell gas, or think that you smell gas, call the gas company or fire department immediately.Gas is distributed to most buildings at low pressure. The gas comes either from pipes that run under the street (called natural gas) or from propane storage tanks. The propane storage tanks are either located behind a building or are buried underground.

A perfume is added to natural gas. You smell this perfume when you "smell gas". If you smell gas, or think that you smell gas, call the gas company or fire department immediately.  Gas leaks should only be repaired by qualified individuals.

The gas is distributed through the building in pipes. Natural gas is typically distributed in the house or building via black iron or galvanized lines. Propane gas may be distributed in copper lines, although many communities prohibit copper lines due to the risk of damage and leaks.

If you smell gas,
or think that you smell gas,
call the gas company or
fire department immediately

Gas is safe as long as the gas equipment is installed and maintained properly. The Professional Engineer checks for visible problems with the gas plumbing.

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Applying Scientific and
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Call for a Home InspectionHeimer Engineering New York pre-purchase home, building, condo, and co‑op inspectionsHeimer Engineering℠ is happy to help you. Senior Staff members are available Monday through Friday from 9 AM to 5 PM.  After 5 PM, please leave a message. Messages are checked during the day on Sunday, and Sunday evening through Thursday evening. Inspections are performed seven days a week.

Heimer Engineering's℠ inspection fees are competitive with non-Engineer Home Inspector's fees, especially when you consider that many non-Engineers charge extra for termite inspections, swimming pools, etc.

Inspection orders are taken by senior staff members. A real estate purchase is complex and you should be able to speak with someone who can answer your inspection questions.

To set up an appointment for a pre-purchase inspection or to find out about Engineering services or expert court testimony email Info@heimer.com, text 888.769.6910, or call 646.757.4500. If no staff member is in the office, leave a message.

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Heimer Engineering's℠ Professional Engineer Home Inspectors substantially adhere to the InterNACHI® Code of Ethics, to Subpart 197-4 of the State of New York Code of Ethics and Regulations for Home Inspectors, the ASHI® Standards of Practice, and the National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE®) Code of Ethics. In the event of a conflict, the Professional Engineer Home Inspectors use Engineering judgment to decide what standard or Engineering principle takes precedence. All State of New York Licensed Professional Engineers are bound by New York State Education Law Article 145.

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Inspections are performed only after the client signs a Pre-Inspection Agreement. Use of this website is governed by our Terms of Use. This website is made available for informational purposes and does not represent a professional opinion of your situation.

Heimer Engineering PC℠ performs home inspections, building inspections, condo inspections, and co-op inspections in the State of New York. Expert witness services are provided regarding playground injuries, parking lot, walkway, and stairway slip, trip, and fall.

The Heimer Engineering PC℠ website was designed and is maintained by . The contents of this website were written by . This website is not intended to offer Engineering opinions or advice. Sitemaps and indexing information can be found at Page Sitemap, Image Sitemap, Mobile Sitemap, and Video Sitemap.

©1997-2018 Andrea and Harold Krongelb. All rights reserved. Used under a revocable license by Heimer Engineering PC. All documents and methods used by Heimer Engineering PC are owned by Harold and Andrea Krongelb and are used under a revocable license.

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Heimer Engineering PC
2171 Jericho Turnpike, Suite 230
Commack, New York, USA 11725-2947

New York Metro: 646.757.4500
Bronx, New York: 718.547.2000
Brooklyn, New York: 718.237.7777
Manhattan, New York: 212.563.4777
Long Island, New York: 516.487.2100
Long Island, New York: 631.549.2500
Nassau County, New York: 516.487.2100
Putnam County, New York: 845.638.4900
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